5/1/2010

Torque Multiplier Display Wrench

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The Stanley Proto Torque Multiplier Display Wrench eliminates the need for manual calculation on a torque multiplier by measuring torque directly at the fastener with an accuracy of ± 1% in both directions.

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The Stanley Proto (http://www.stanleyproto.com/) Torque Multiplier Display Wrench eliminates the need for manual calculation on a torque multiplier by measuring torque directly at the fastener with an accuracy of ± 1% in both directions. The display wrench is placed between the multiplier and fastener and displays the actual applied torque to the fastener. The tool has a 1-in. drive and is available in torque ranges of 100 to 1000 ft.-lb. and 200 to 2000 ft-lb. Both display wrenches are 24-in. long.
 

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