5/1/2010

Series 4000i Marking System

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Series 4000i marking system.

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The Series 4000i marking system by R.P. Gatta, Inc. (rpgatta.com) uses an ABB IRB 4600 robot for pin stamp, scribe, and laser marking. The agility of the 6-axis robot allows it to mark anywhere on a part regardless of the geometry and orientation. Its uses include marking serial numbers, dates, barcodes, and other marks on major components such as engines and transmissions.
 

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