Cullinan: SUV, Car, Diamond

Rolls-Royce has revealed the Cullinan today, which is its take on an SUV, except that it also describes the vehicle as an “all-terrain high-bodied car.” The face of the Cullinan is said to feature “the prominent brow of a Saxon warrior.” [Ahem.] One of the points that the company makes regarding the new vehicle is that it has, in its estimation, a three-box design, which generally means for those of us on this side of the Atlantic a trunk, or on the other side a boot, but either way there doesn’t seem to be that third box (but the company points out that there is a “rear partition wall” that separates the rear passengers from whatever cargo there might be packed away in the 560 liters (19.78 cubic-feet) of space behind that wall.

Rolls-Royce has revealed the Cullinan today, which is its take on an SUV, except that it also describes the vehicle as an “all-terrain high-bodied car.”

Cullinan1

The face of the Cullinan is said to feature “the prominent brow of a Saxon warrior.” [Ahem.]

One of the points that the company makes regarding the new vehicle is that it has, in its estimation, a three-box design, which generally means for those of us on this side of the Atlantic a trunk, or on the other side a boot, but either way there doesn’t seem to be that third box (but the company points out that there is a “rear partition wall” that separates the rear passengers from whatever cargo there might be packed away in the 560 liters (19.78 cubic-feet) of space behind that wall).

Cullinan2

This is said to have a three-box design. Maybe one needs to squint. Vigorously.

What is a bit puzzling is that the rear seats can be electronically folded down so that there is 1,930 liters (68 cubic feet) of cargo area (“for those wishing to carry a long item back from their trip—whether it be a Mark Rothko from the Art Gallery or a newly discovered artifact from the latest archaeological dig”), which would mean that the person who owns the Cullinan would actually be driving the Cullinan, not being driven in it (unless, of course, that person would be sitting in the front passenger seat, which would seem rather déclassé).

The vehicle rides on 22-inch wheels and provides “the deepest wading depth of any super-luxury SUV at 540 mm,” which is roughly 21 inches. (Here’s a diamonds-to-apples comparison: the 2018 Jeep Wrangler has a fording depth of up to 30 inches, so if you’re trying to escape with that Rothko or artefact and there’s water involved, you might want to take the Wrangler which, incidentally, with its rear seats folded, offers 72.4 cubic feet of cargo capacity.)

According to Rolls the vehicle, which is based on an aluminum architecture, was “tested to destruction all over the planet.” Which is certainly encouraging, assuming that it was robust enough not to meet its limits earlier rather than later.

Of one thing that there is little doubt is that the Cullinan is powerful: it has a 6.75-liter twin-turbo V12 that produces 563 hp and 627 lb-ft of torque. And it offers all-wheel drive and all-wheel steering, presumable for maneuvering this land yacht across whatever terrain it encounters.

Apparently T.E. Lawrence once observed, “A Rolls in the desert is above rubies.”

The name Cullinan was taken from the largest diamond ever discovered. Presumably diamonds trump rubies.