10/3/2006

Talking to Designers: Dodge Challenger

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“We had to do some tricks to capture and create the illusion of certain things, like where the windshield cuts down on the LX—the dash-to-axle—is really short.

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“We had to do some tricks to capture and create the illusion of certain things, like where the windshield cuts down on the LX—the dash-to-axle—is really short. On the original Challenger, it has a much longer dash-to-axle, kind of a cab rear and long hood. One of the tricks we did to give that perception was we held the centerline of the windshield but we wrapped the A-pillars back so it gives the perception that you’re reading from the A-pillar to the axle. We also pulled the side-view mirror back slightly. They’re little things, but when you stack them up . . .”—Alan Barrington, interior designer, Dodge Challenger, on creating the look of the original 1970 Challenger while using the LX platform (which underpins the 300, Magnum and Charger). The Challenger concept was announced as a production vehicle for the ’08 model year.—GSV
 

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