Mazda: Looks Great, Less Gas

Although Mazda is a mass-market manufacturer of vehicles, its market isn’t all that mass because the people at Mazda intensely focus on those who are interested in driving.

Although Mazda is a mass-market manufacturer of vehicles, its market isn’t all that mass because the people at Mazda intensely focus on those who are interested in driving. Consequently, the engineers pay a whole lot of attention to acceleration, ride and handling, ergonomics, and the like.

And the designers create cars that are as striking to look at as they are to drive.

M

(People often cite the Ford Fusion as the most stylish midsize sedan. I’d argue that the reason they do that is because they haven’t seen the Mazda6. That is, through September, there have been, according to Autodata, 240,585 Fusions delivered and just 41,861 Mazda6s. So the odds of seeing one are less.)

Anyway, it is most impressive that this company that is focusing on the driver and the driving experience has, for the second year in a row, been named the most-fuel efficient auto manufacturer in the U.S. by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

According to the EPA’s “Light Duty Fuel Economy Trends” report, Mazda’s fleet-wide adjusted fuel economy performance for model year 2013 is 28.1 mpg. (It also has the lowest adjusted CO2 emissions, at 316.)

Honda is second, followed by Subaru, Nissan, VW, Toyota, BMW, Daimler, Ford, GM, and Fiat Chrysler.

And it is interesting to note that there is a non-trivial spread between first and last places. Fiat Chrysler came in at 20.9.

Presumably those HEMIs and Ram sales had something to do with that.