Intel on the Numbers of Autonomy

If you sometimes wonder why the automotive OEMs and Tier One suppliers have to work with or become more familiar with Big Data and the companies that are associated with handling, processing and using it, you can get your answer by listening to Brian Krzanich, CEO of Intel, speaking at the AutoMobility LA conference.

If you sometimes wonder why the automotive OEMs and Tier One suppliers have to work with or become more familiar with Big Data and the companies that are associated with handling, processing and using it, you can get your answer by listening to Brian Krzanich, CEO of Intel, speaking at the AutoMobility LA conference.

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Krzanich may call “data the new oil”—but it almost seems an understatement for autonomous driving

According to Krzanich, the average person, though the use of PCs, phones, smartwatches, and the like, generates 650 MB of data a day.

Intel anticipates that the amount of data daily generated by you and me will be on the order of 1.5 GB

That may be a lot (try and download 1.5 GB on your home computer and see how long it takes), but as Krzanich puts it, “it pales in comparison to what we’re about to see in autonomous vehicles.”

There’s radar. Cameras. Sonar. GPS. Lidar.

Krzanich: “Cameras will generate 20-60 MB/second, radar upwards of 10 kB/second, sonar 10-100 kB/second, GPS will run at 50 kB/second, and LIDAR will range between 10-70 MB/second.”

So, he does a little math and: “each autonomous vehicle will be generating approximately 4,000 GB – or 4 terabytes – of data a day.”

Or as much as 3,000 people per day. One car.

Multiply that by as many cars as you can imagine being out there by about 2020, and you can see there is a massive amount of data that needs handling.

Intel Capital announced this week that it is investing an additional $250-million over the next two years specifically addressing the development of autonomous driving.

Almost seems small in the context of four terabytes.