Ford Five-O

Although many people associate the Ford Crown Victoria with people who often resemble Queen Victoria, those people probably haven’t glanced in their rearview mirrors and seen an ominous-looking vehicle with flashing lights back there: a Crown Victoria Police Interceptor.

Although many people associate the Ford Crown Victoria with people who often resemble Queen Victoria, those people probably haven’t glanced in their rearview mirrors and seen an ominous-looking vehicle with flashing lights back there: a Crown Victoria Police Interceptor.

Not only does Ford lead in the light truck segment of the market, it also leads in the police vehicle market, and has done so for 15 years.

But one problem is that the Crown Victoria is, well, becoming like the aforementioned queen. The big rear-drive car is built at the Ford St. Thomas Assembly Plant in Ontario—which is scheduled to be closed next year. (The St. Thomas Plant is where the Mercury Grand Marquis and Lincoln Town Car are produced, too.)

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So the good news for police departments and the bad news for perps is that Ford has unveiled a concept of the purpose-built Police Interceptor sedan, which is to be built at the Ford Chicago Assembly Plant, which is home to the Ford Taurus and the Lincoln MKS, so it is certainly at a place that has a whole lot of vibrancy.

One of the options that is being made available is the EcoBoost twin-turbocharged engine, a 3.5-liter that will deliver somewhere in the vicinity of 365 hp and 350 lb-ft of torque—power that is in line with a V8 but with the fuel-efficiency of a V6.

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With the EcoBoost box checked and the six-speed SelectShift Automatic transmission, the Police Interceptor will have a torque-sensing all-wheel-drive system. (The standard drivetrain is a 263-hp V6 and front-wheel drive.)

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One interesting aspect of the interior design is that there is a column-shift, not the seemingly standard console-mounted shift. The reason: To provide the space necessary for gear. The seats—front and back—are specially designed. One feature of the front seats that you won’t find in your daily driver: Anti-stab plates are fitting into the seatbacks to protect the front-seat occupants (a.k.a., the good guys).

According to Ford’s Carl Widmann, vehicle engineering manager, “This vehicle is pursuit-ready. It’s no nonsense, through and through.”

All of which is to say that you should watch your speed because you don’t want to see one of these in your rearview mirror.

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