Citroën and the Concorde

The Citroën DS was designed by Flaminio Bertoni and André Lefèbure; it had its run from 1955 to 1975.

The Citroën DS was designed by Flaminio Bertoni and André Lefèbure; it had its run from 1955 to 1975. When the car debuted, its form was considered to be exceedingly aerodynamic and futuristic. Lefèbure, it is worth noting, began his career as an aviation engineer, so maybe there really was an influence on things like the angle of attack and drag of the car moving through the air.

And maybe this is why Citroën commissioned photographs of the DS with the Concorde, which was a joint venture between the French company Aerospatiale and the British concern BAC:

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As we now know, the Concorde, which made its first flight in 1969 and went into service in 1976, had its last flight in 2003. Given that throughout its career flying on the Concorde was considered a step above even a first-class seat on a conventional Air France or British Air flight, its end was somewhat ignominious.

Which makes it a bit odd that Citroën has had a series of photos taken of its contemporary DS5 by photographer Laurent Nivalle at the Le Bourget Airport in France—with a Concorde.

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While the car does have interior design cues that are aircraft-inspired (e.g., switches positioned overhead), one of the reasons why it the Concorde was grounded nine years ago, it has been suggested, is because the plane (due to no other supersonic competition) hadn’t really been technically upgraded (e.g., analog gauges in the cockpit) so it was somewhat behind the times, not avant garde, as it had once been.