6/5/2018

Tech Watch: Fabric That Feels You

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

BeBop makes sensors for automotive occupant classification systems (OCS), which estimate the weight of passengers to deploy an airbag accordingly.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

The fabric sensors are coming, and with $10-million in series A venture funding from San Francisco-based Bullpen Capital, BeBop Sensors (bebopsensors.com) wants to be among the first of the sensor companies in that space to arrive. Its primary automotive destination: Your car seat and possibly your kid’s car seat. 

BeBop makes sensors for automotive occupant classification systems (OCS), which estimate the weight of passengers to deploy an airbag accordingly. BeBop says its smart fabric, which measures about 1-mm thick, continuously monitors seat pressure imaging, providing real-time data used to gauge all physical contact between the passenger and the seat. In tune with computer vision software, the sensor understands occupant position and all movements, including leaning forward, left, or right, crossing legs, and detecting the rigid bottom of a child booster seat—in addition to calculating size and weight. 

“Anyone trying to determine a person’s position, size and seating attitude using only weight is making a faster horse,” Keith McMillen, BeBop founder and CEO notes on the company’s website. “That technology is now obsolete. You can tell more about a person through a picture than a scale.”
 

RELATED CONTENT

  • How General Motors Develops World-Class Propulsion Systems

    Dan Nicholson is vice president of General Motors Global Propulsion Systems, the organization that had been “GM Powertrain” for 24 years.

  • 2018 Lexus NX 300h

    While you are probably familiar with origami, the classic art of paper folding that results in things like birds that flap their wings when you pull the tail, or plot devices in one of the Blade Runner films.

  • NISSAN'S Platform Play

    The mid-size 2005 Pathfinder, Nissan's largest design and development program to date, involved three technical centers, and took 36 months and countless trans-Pacific trips to complete. Though it borrows major components from the full-size Titan pickup and Armada SUV, it's not just a downsized clone.


Resources