Maven Amps Up the Gig

Rachel Bhattacharya, Chief Growth Officer for Maven, General Motors car-sharing service, said in a presentation at the Center for Automotive Research’s Management Briefing Seminars a couple week back that the Chevy Bolt EVs that are in the Maven fleet—there are more than 100 available in LA now, and they’re going to double that number, and the Bolt fleet in San Francisco will also double to more than 125 by the end of 2017; there have been more than 1.4-million miles racked up in Maven Gig Bolt EVs since February—are hugely popular (do the math: a comparatively small number of cars, a comparatively large number of miles). And what is undoubtedly going to amp up the popularity is that Maven has announced that it is now offering Maven Gig vehicles in LA, as well as San Francisco and San Diego.

Rachel Bhattacharya, Chief Growth Officer for Maven, General Motors car-sharing service, said in a presentation at the Center for Automotive Research’s Management Briefing Seminars a couple week back that the Chevy Bolt EVs that are in the Maven fleet—there are more than 100 available in LA now, and they’re going to double that number, and the Bolt fleet in San Francisco will also double to more than 125 by the end of 2017; there have been more than 1.4-million miles racked up in Maven Gig Bolt EVs since February—are hugely popular (do the math: a comparatively small number of cars, a comparatively large number of miles).

And what is undoubtedly going to amp up the popularity is that Maven has announced that it is now offering Maven Gig vehicles in LA, as well as San Francisco and San Diego. Plans call to roll Maven Gig out in Boston, Phoenix, Washington, D.C., Baltimore, and Detroit in the months ahead.

MavenGig

Maven Gig is a service that allows drivers to get vehicles for a remarkably low weekly rate that they can then use for running their gigs—like driving for Uber, Lyft, HopSkipDrive, GrubHub, and other operations. (There is also Maven City car sharing, which provides access to cars for people who are not pursuing freelance bucks and simply want to get somewhere.)

Consider: after a one-time $20-application fee, Gig drivers can get a flat weekly rate that includes a car, unlimited mileage, insurance (minus deductibles), and maintenance. And the weekly rates are nothing if not impressive: $189 plus taxes for a Chevrolet Cruze, $209 plus taxes for a Chevrolet Malibu, $219 plus taxes for a Trax, $225 plus taxes for an Impala, and $229 plus taxes for a Bolt EV.

Vehicles, not surprisingly, are reserved via an app.

While some might argue that GM is actually undercutting itself by offering something like Maven—after all, the argument might go, if you have access to a car or a ride when you need it, you might not buy a car—there are actually two reasons why this could be advantageous to the company:

1. Drivers (and riders) who have access to the vehicles may be sufficiently impressed by them such that were they going to buy a car, there may be a bias toward one of those Chevys

2. If there is, as seems to be the case, an ever-increasing deployment of ride-hailing and car-sharing, GM will be well positioned with a solid, existing operation.

Incidentally, should you be interested in learning more about the Maven strategy, know that Rachel Bhattacharya will be speaking at our second annual Autonomy + Mobility conference that will be held in Detroit on October 25. She’ll be joined by speakers from VW, Toyota, Intel, Bosch, and others. You can learn more about it here.

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