2/25/2019

Is the Minimó the Future of Urban Mobility?

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

If you’ve ever had the opportunity to wander around off the main thoroughfares in Barcelona, you’ve undoubtedly notices that the streets tend to be narrow and more oriented toward people rather than cars and certainly trucks.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

If you’ve ever had the opportunity to wander around off the main thoroughfares in Barcelona, you’ve undoubtedly notices that the streets tend to be narrow and more oriented toward people rather than cars and certainly trucks. As vehicle manufacturer SEAT is headquartered in Martorell, a section of Barcelona, its designers and engineers are undoubtedly exceedingly aware of the traffic patterns, so it is no surprise that today at the Mobile World Congress—which is going on in Barcelona right now, but which is not “mobile” in the sense of being focused on transportation but on “flexible, high-speed 5G networks, the Internet of Things (IoT), artificial intelligence (AI) and big data”—SEAT unveiled the Minimó, an all-electric quadracycle designed to address issues of urban mobility.

Minimó1

The vehicle is compact, with an overall length of 98.4 inches, a width of 48.8 inches and a footprint of 33.4-square feet. It has an enclosed cabin and 1+1 seating.

The doors, which open upward, are asymmetrical, with the passenger door being larger than the driver in order to facilitate ingress and egress of the passenger and/or packages.

The battery pack provides a range of 62 miles. It is packaged under the floor of the vehicle and is designed so that there can be a quick swap with a charged battery.

Minimó2

An intent is that the quadracycle would be part of a shared mobility services operation.

According to Alejandro Mesonero, Design Director at SEAT, “The design of the Minimó shows the way we understand urban mobility: efficiency, high value and cost saving – combined with a vibrant design. Our Minimó demonstrates that there is space for fun and style when we are talking about electric and shared vehicles. More than ever – design matters.”

The Minimó is designed to be activated with a digital key and runs Android Auto. In the event that Level 4 autonomous capability gets developed, the Minimó will accommodate it.

Minimo3

RELATED CONTENT

  • Breaking Down the Chevy Bolt

    Sandy Munro and his team of engineers and costing analysts at Munro & Associates were contacted by UBS Research—an arm of the giant banking and investment firm—and asked whether it was possible to do a teardown and cost assessment of the Chevrolet Bolt EV.

  • Pacifica Hybrid Explained

    Chrysler pioneered the modern-day minivan more than 30 years ago and has been refining and improving that type of vehicle ever since.

  • Designing the 2019 Ram 1500

    Ram Truck chief exterior designer Joe Dehner talks about how they’ve developed the all-new pickup. “We’ve been building trucks for over 100 years,” he says. “Best I could come up with is that this is our 15th-generation truck.”