2/22/2019

How to Keep a Last-gen Truck Current

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When Ram Truck launched the 2019 Ram 1500 pickup truck, the company didn’t want to simply stop building the last-generation vehicle at the Warren Truck Assembly Plant (which has been in operation since 1938, during which time it has produced more than 12.5-million trucks). Rather, they kept it in production adding the word “Classic” to the name, thereby indicating its difference from the new truck (built at the Sterling Heights Assembly Plant). In order to keep the Classic of interest, the company has gone back to 1976, the year they launched the Dodge Warlock, a “factory-personalized” pickup, and have created the 2019 Ram 1500 Classic Warlock.

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When Ram Truck launched the 2019 Ram 1500 pickup truck, the company didn’t want to simply stop building the last-generation vehicle at the Warren Truck Assembly Plant (which has been in operation since 1938, during which time it has produced more than 12.5-million trucks). Rather, they kept it in production adding the word “Classic” to the name, thereby indicating its difference from the new truck (built at the Sterling Heights Assembly Plant). In order to keep the Classic of interest, the company has gone back to 1976, the year they launched the Dodge Warlock, a “factory-personalized” pickup, and have created the 2019 Ram 1500 Classic Warlock. It is available in 10 colors, but the point is a somewhat monochromatic look, with a black grille, 20-inch semi-gloss black aluminum wheels, front and rear powder-coated bumpers, back wheel flares, projector headlamps with dark bezels, black badging, and. . . decals. Obviously, this is a design play to keep the Classic moving.

Warlock1

Now

Warlock2

Then

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