8/23/2016

Box Full of Soul

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Michael Sprague, chief operating officer and executive vice president, Kia Motors America, makes an interesting observation about things of a boxy nature—vehicles of a boxy configuration, that is.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Michael Sprague, chief operating officer and executive vice president, Kia Motors America, makes an interesting observation about things of a boxy nature—vehicles of a boxy configuration, that is.

It started with the Honda Element, which was launched as a model year 2003 vehicle. Clearly unlike anything else out there at the time.

Element

Then there was the—some might argue—iconic Scion xB, a model year 2004 vehicle, which put Scion on the scene in a way that even surprised the people at Toyota (Scion’s parent).

xB

Then there was the Nissan Cube, which made its way to the U.S. in 2009.

2014 Nissan cube

And last but not least, there’s the Kia Soul, which appeared in the U.S. in 2010.

2016 Soul

Last year, there were 147,133 Souls delivered, up from 145,316 in 2014. A slight bump, but a bump nonetheless. That makes the Soul number two only to the Optima (159,414 in 2015) in the Kia lineup.

The other boxes are boxed out of the market.

The Soul endures, and according to Sprague, will continue to.

RELATED CONTENT

  • 2017 Mazda CX-5 Grand Touring AWD

    The Mazda CX-5 first appeared on the scene in 2012, and for 2017, the vehicle has undergone some major transformations, to enhance what was already a notable small crossover.

  • Designing the 2019 Ram 1500

    Ram Truck chief exterior designer Joe Dehner talks about how they’ve developed the all-new pickup. “We’ve been building trucks for over 100 years,” he says. “Best I could come up with is that this is our 15th-generation truck.”  

  • 2018 Lexus NX 300h

    While you are probably familiar with origami, the classic art of paper folding that results in things like birds that flap their wings when you pull the tail, or plot devices in one of the Blade Runner films.