4/16/2012

Better Cars, Better Fuel Efficiency

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One of the direct effects of things like EcoBoost, Ecotec, and MultiAir engines, as well as appealing products that are wrapped around them, such as Cruzes and 500s is that for the first time ever, the average fuel economy of all vehicles sold in the U.S. during March was 24.1 mpg, according to researchers at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI). That’s as in all cars, light trucks, minivans, and SUVs.

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Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

One of the direct effects of things like EcoBoost, Ecotec, and MultiAir engines, as well as appealing products that are wrapped around them, such as Cruzes and 500s is that for the first time ever, the average fuel economy of all vehicles sold in the U.S. during March was 24.1 mpg, according to researchers at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI).

That’s as in all cars, light trucks, minivans, and SUVs.

UMTRI researchers Michael Sivak and Brandon Schoettle found that in February the average fuel economy--based on what is says on window stickers, which, as driver’s know, need to be taken with a somewhat skeptical eye vis-à-vis the real world—was 23.9 mpg and 23.6 mpg in January, so there is evidentially a nice climb up toward efficiency.

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Source: UMTRI

Back in October 2007, when they started running the numbers, there were four fewer mpgs, or a 20% delta between now and then.

Back in October 2007, with few exceptions (e.g., cars offered by the likes of Honda, Toyota and Nissan) small, fuel-efficient cars tended to be not particularly desirable.

Make ‘em good, make ‘em efficient, and price ‘em accordingly: Therein lies success and fuel efficiency.


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