1/23/2012 | 1 MINUTE READ

Audi and the Digital Future

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  The Digital Life Design (DLD) Conference is underway in Munich, and a keynote address was given by. . .the chairman of the board of an automotive company, Rupert Stadler of Audi AG.

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The Digital Life Design (DLD) Conference is underway in Munich, and a keynote address was given by. . .the chairman of the board of an automotive company, Rupert Stadler of Audi AG.

To be sure, Audi is at the leading edge of digital implementation in its vehicles, offering, for example, navigation based on Google Earth, an amazing display compared with even some of the most advanced navigation systems offered by competitors.

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Rupert Stadler, chairman of the Board of Management, Audi AG, anticipates a connected future

Still, it underlines the fact that although the digital future may be one wherein people spend an increasing amount of their time sitting in environments other than cars, communicating and interacting via digital means, eventually people have to go somewhere, be it to the nearby Fry’s Electronics for some more gear or to Starbuck’s for a beverage.

Stadler suggested that the driving experience of the future may be more seamless, saying, “A digitized car that communicates with other vehicles and the environment might one day be able to do without traffic lights.”

Of course, in that future the average age of a car on the road wouldn’t be on the order of 10.8 years because if that is the case, that whole vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure thing wouldn’t work out so well.


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