9/15/2015 | 1 MINUTE READ

A Bit About the Bentley Bentayga

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

By now you have probably heard about the new SUV from Bentley Motors, the Bentayga, the vehicle that, with a twin-turbocharged W12 engine, which produces 600 hp and 663 lb-ft of torque, which powers the vehicle to 0 to 60 in 4 seconds and provides a top speed of 187 mph, is said to be “the world’s most powerful and fastest SUV.” And you’ve probably seen pictures of the Bentayga, with its massive grille flanked by four LED headlamps, and a skid plate on the lower side of the front bumper, deliberately located to align with the Bentley floating wing motif.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

By now you have probably heard about the new SUV from Bentley Motors, the Bentayga, the vehicle that, with a twin-turbocharged W12 engine, which produces 600 hp and 663 lb-ft of torque, which powers the vehicle to 0 to 60 in 4 seconds and provides a top speed of 187 mph, is said to be “the world’s most powerful and fastest SUV.”

B

And you’ve probably seen pictures of the Bentayga, with its massive grille flanked by four LED headlamps, and a skid plate on the lower side of the front bumper, deliberately located to align with the Bentley floating wing motif.

For those keeping track: the Bentayga is an aluminum-intensive vehicle. Bentley calculates that overall, there is a weight save on the order of 263 kg compared to a conventional all-steel build.

This is arguably my favorite photo of the Bentayga, as it shows the vehicle in its most essential form, sans the stampings and the acres of leather that are used to provide a cossetting cabin:

B

The vehicle is setup for both on- and off-road capabilities. The driver selects them through the Drive Dynamics Mode and the curiously optional Off-Road Setting (it is curious because it is optional). In all there are up to eight dial-selectable modes.

In addition to which there are the Bentley Dynamic Ride (this is active roll control that’s based on a 48-Volt system) and electric power-assisted steering.

Because the driver might find him or herself in some rather dodgy conditions, there is a Driver Information Panel in the gauge cluster that provides information on the pitch, roll, wheel articulation, steering angle, compass bearing, and altitude.

Presumably that’s important should you be in a place where the “class-leading navigation technology” be not up to snuff.

Speaking of finding oneself in demanding conditions, there is an optional Park Assist feature that detects available parking places, then activates autonomous steering to get the Bentayga into the parallel or perpendicular space.

 


RELATED CONTENT

  • BMW and Toyota and FMCW Lidar

    This is not a piece of modern art: Rather, it is an image from Blackmore Sensors and Analytics of Bozeman, Montana, micro-Doppler signatures of pedestrians (or maybe that’s a pedestrian, singular) walking (see it now?). Blackmore is a company that is developing FMCW lidar.

  • NISSAN'S Platform Play

    The mid-size 2005 Pathfinder, Nissan's largest design and development program to date, involved three technical centers, and took 36 months and countless trans-Pacific trips to complete. Though it borrows major components from the full-size Titan pickup and Armada SUV, it's not just a downsized clone.

  • Designing the 2019 Ram 1500

    Ram Truck chief exterior designer Joe Dehner talks about how they’ve developed the all-new pickup. “We’ve been building trucks for over 100 years,” he says. “Best I could come up with is that this is our 15th-generation truck.”  

Resources