2/2/2018 | 1 MINUTE READ

100-million Units and Still Going Strong

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In 1995, Java 1.0 was released, Internet Explorer 1.0 was introduced, and Intel brought out the Pentium Pro.

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In 1995, Java 1.0 was released, Internet Explorer 1.0 was introduced, and Intel brought out the Pentium Pro. And it was the year, of course, of Windows 95.

That all seems rather quaint now, doesn’t it?

Yet also in 1995 (and into ’96) Continental developed a magnetic passive position sensor (MAPPS) that is used to gage the fluid level in a fuel tank and the company has been producing the sensors in its Dortmund Arminiusstrasse facility since 2001.

MAPPS

Earlier this week the company announced that they’ve produced 100-million MAPPS.

What’s interesting to note is that the MAPPS, which features a leak-proof seal and so is corrosion-proof, thereby being able to be immersed in all types of fuel, sulfur, ethanol and methanol concentrations notwithstanding, is, according to Conti, a product that has been able to “last two decades without encountering any competition.” Which can’t be said of Java, IE, Pentiums and Windows 95.

What’s more, the company has spent some 8-million € in Dortmund to bring up a third production line for MAPPS so that they’ll have the capacity to produce over 15-million units per year to meet the growing demand.

Incidentally: the first PlayStation made it to the U.S. in 1995.


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