1/1/2009

Vibrational Power

While vibration is the White Whale of any NVH engineer, a little rattle may mean a little more energy and a little less weight in future vehicles.
Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

During a one-minute cycle, the module is capable of churning up to 35 mJ (millijoules) from 1 grms (G Force root-mean-square) load acceleration at 120 Hz. That translates to about 0.8 milliwatt in 60 seconds.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

That’s the claim from AdaptivEnergy (Hampton, Virginia; www.rlpenergy.com) and its Joule-Thief piezo-based “energy harvester” module, a matchbook-sized circuit that “feeds” on vehicle vibrations so fine they can’t be felt by humans, yet will generate power in return. Just how much juice? During a one-minute cycle, the module is capable of churning up to 35 mJ (millijoules) from 1 grms (G Force root-mean-square) load acceleration at 120 Hz. That translates to about 0.8 milliwatt in 60 seconds. Not much, but enough to power a wireless sensor. AdaptivEnergy notes that most background vibrations are below 0.2 grms, under which the circuit could generate more than 10 mJ of energy.

The module could prove a helpful stowaway for auto manufacturers interested in lowering vehicle curb weight. AdaptivEnergy claims the device has the potential of knocking off hundreds of pounds of electrical wiring harnesses, as well as the batteries to power sensors embedded in hard-to-reach door panels and roofliners. 

RELATED CONTENT

  • Designing the 2019 Ram 1500

    Ram Truck chief exterior designer Joe Dehner talks about how they’ve developed the all-new pickup. “We’ve been building trucks for over 100 years,” he says. “Best I could come up with is that this is our 15th-generation truck.”  

  • Developing the 10th-Generation Honda Civic

    The 2016 model is all-new. As in platform and everything else. And the platform—which will have global use—was developed in North America.

  • Pacifica Hybrid Explained

    Chrysler pioneered the modern-day minivan more than 30 years ago and has been refining and improving that type of vehicle ever since.


Resources