8/17/2011

Poly-Jet

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Poly-Jet (PJET) uses inkjet heads to jet a UV-curable material in very thin layers at high resolution.

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� Poly-Jet (PJET) uses inkjet heads to jet a UV-curable material in very thin layers at high resolution. The materials are jetted in ultra-thin layers onto a build tray, layer by layer, until the part is completed. Each photopolymer layer is cured by UV light immediately after it is jetted. The gel-like support material, which is specially designed to support complicated geometries, is easily removed by hand and water jetting. This method has the same shortcomings as SLA, but it can yield an even better surface finish.
 

Pros: This process yields a good surface finish; the best of the additive processes. It is the best additive choice for complex parts with undercuts. The process can make parts with complex geometries.
 

Cons: PJET parts have poor strength (comparable to SLA). While PJET can make parts with complex geometries, it gives no insight into the eventual manufacturability of the design.

Proto Labs

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