4/4/2011

Open Design Language

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The open source licensing model, where users submit improvements to software code that are incorporated in future revisions, has proven to be a successful way to develop advanced, robust code quickly.

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The open source licensing model, where users submit improvements to software code that are incorporated in future revisions, has proven to be a successful way to develop advanced, robust code quickly. Linux is the most notable example. Synopsys, Inc. (Mountain View, CA; www.synopsys.com), is adopting the model for its MAST electromechanical design and analysis language. Called OpenMAST, the new open, standardized version of MAST was created in response to automotive designers' requests for improved model exchange between OEMs and suppliers. With the steep rise in complexity of software-controlled electromechanical systems in vehicles and a host of new verification methodologies, designers are having a hard time ensuring that their models can be viewed and analyzed by others. Synopsys' hope is that OpenMAST can soon provide a standard language that underlies an open modeling and verification environment for the electromechanical design community.

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