12/6/2005

F1 biplanes?

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Bored by the continuing saga of high-dollar single seaters that can't pass each other because of aerodynamic turbulence?

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Bored by the continuing saga of high-dollar single seaters that can't pass each other because of aerodynamic turbulence? So-finally-is the FIA, the international governing body that writes the rules for Formula One. Its answer is the Centerline Downwash Generating (CDG) Wing that places smaller wings behind each rear wheel, and eliminates the section between the tires. The result may look odd, but computer simulation says the new design should allow following cars to tuck up close to those in front without losing downforce on their the front wings. This means more passing opportunities. Unless, of course, monetary considerations kill the idea before it gets a chance to prove itself. The rear wing is prime sponsor real estate (the teams charge lots of money to put a company's name there), and there is a lot of pressure to keep this cash cow in one piece.
 

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