3/1/2002 | 1 MINUTE READ

Before the Job

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One of the aspects of robotic body painting that Carl Traynor, senior director of Marketing, Motoman, Inc. (West Carrollton, OH), emphasizes has more to do with what goes on before the task is done rather than during the operation.Simulation.Traynor says that the real benefit of simulation for painting is that the process is “path intensive,” so it is essential to make sure that the robot arm is traveling along the proper route for efficiency, both in terms of where the arm goes and how it applies materials to the bodies (the right place in both cases means no waste). The MotoSim simulation package, Traynor says, is pretty much a fundamental to many of the robotic applications that Motoman’s robots are applied to.

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One of the aspects of robotic body painting that Carl Traynor, senior director of Marketing, Motoman, Inc. (West Carrollton, OH), emphasizes has more to do with what goes on before the task is done rather than during the operation.

Simulation.

Traynor says that the real benefit of simulation for painting is that the process is “path intensive,” so it is essential to make sure that the robot arm is traveling along the proper route for efficiency, both in terms of where the arm goes and how it applies materials to the bodies (the right place in both cases means no waste). The MotoSim simulation package, Traynor says, is pretty much a fundamental to many of the robotic applications that Motoman’s robots are applied to. He also notes that there are solid connections to the major simulation packages available from other vendors, as well.

When asked about differentiation between Motoman robots and those of its worthy competitors, Traynor cites the extensive laser cutting applications that those robots are applied to: Given the diameter of a laser beam (especially as contrasted to the size of a spray from a bell or a gun), precision location is a must, as is steady by fast travel.

The robot that he cites as particularly advantageous for body applications is the PX 2900 (the number relates to the length of the arm in millimeters). He suggests that the arm length is beneficial in that it probably eliminates the need for an external seventh axis to provide range, even for big bodies (e.g., pickup trucks). By eliminating that external axis, both the complexity of the installation and programming are minimized. Which means getting things done before painting can be expedited.—GSV

The PX 2850 has a 2,850-mm reach. There’s also a longer stretch: the PX 2900. 

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