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Being able to obtain prototype parts quickly to test for component fit and function can help get your product to market faster than your competition. But there are a great many options to choose from. Adjustments in design, materials, size, shape, assembly, color, manufacturability and strength can be made following the results of your testing and analysis.

Many prototyping processes are available to today’s product design teams. Some prototyping processes utilize traditional manufacturing methods to produce prototypes. Other technologies have emerged and have been improved upon over a relatively short period of time. There are dozens of ways prototypes can be made. As prototyping processes continue to evolve, the product designer is constantly trying to determine what process or technology is best for their unique application.

Here you will find process descriptions and insights into the material properties of parts produced by each specific prototyping process. In addition, a helpful decision tree will highlight key questions designers must consider when choosing a prototyping process.  



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