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Cars were once predominately valued in steel, glass, rubber, and aluminum. Now it’s silicon. Electronics developments drive the vehicles of today and tomorrow.

According to Orth Hedrick, Kia Motors America vice president of Product Planning, all-wheel-drive is an increasingly important offering for compact CUVs. Kia worked with Magna Powertrain  to develop the Dynamax AWD coupling that’s used in the Sportage.
Automotive Electronics

The 2017 Kia Sportage

Kia Motors America COO and executive vice president says this crossover is “crafted for the urban pioneer.” And it is designed and engineered for competing in one of the hottest segments in the overall auto market.

Light Rider

When you think of the forthcoming LA Auto Show and Los Angeles in general, you may think of (1) very expensive, very large vehicles being piloted by very egotistical stars and (2) very jammed freeways full of the aforementioned, as well as numerous other vehicles of a less ostentatious variety.

Mercedes Pairs Hydrogen with Plug-in

While there is increasing attention—thanks, largely, to Tesla in general and the forthcoming introduction, by General Motors, of the Chevrolet Bolt EV—to electric vehicles powered by, well, electricity, there is another type of EV out there that may gain some ground: electric vehicles powered by hydrogen.

Cybersecurity on Wheels

  According to IHS Automotive there are on the order of 112-million vehicles on the road today that are “connected,” that is, “have a connection through the internet, though telematics, an onboard modem or a paired device in the vehicle, such as a mobile phone or other device.” With that last bit about the mobile phone being paired with the car, it is surprising that the number of connected vehicles isn’t greater.