U.S. Car Market: Plenty of CO2

A recent study by JATO Dynamics on CO2 emissions finds that the U.S. light vehicle market is putting out the stuff like mad vis-à-vis drivers in Europe and Japan.

A recent study by JATO Dynamics on CO2 emissions finds that the U.S. light vehicle market is putting out the stuff like mad vis-à-vis drivers in Europe and Japan.

Specifically, the research shows that taking out pickups, full-size vans and small commercial vehicles, the average output of CO2 is 255.6 g/km. In Japan it is just 130.8 g/km, and the average of the five biggest markets in Europe is 140.3 g/km.

Apparently, a large part of the smaller European CO2 emissions is predicated on the larger collection of diesel-powered cars on the road, which account for 48.9%, according to JATO. In Japan, diesels have just 0.11% of the market, but plenty of small cars.

 

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In the U.S., gasoline has 81.9% of the market, according to the research firm.

While all of that may be interesting, one statistic in the report is startling:

33.9% of vehicles sold in the U.S. have a full consumption within the 15 to 20 mpg bracket. In Japan the number is just 0.63% and in Europe it’s just 0.28%--and yes, the decimal point is in the right place.