Unimog: Designed & Engineered to Work

As Spring makes its belated way to the highways and the byways, it brings with it seemingly endless streams of bright orange traffic cones and barrels.

As Spring makes its belated way to the highways and the byways, it brings with it seemingly endless streams of bright orange traffic cones and barrels.

Often, people who have had the opportunity to drive in places like Germany remark something along the lines of “Why can’t our [expletive deleted] roads be as good as the ones in Frankfurt!?!”, especially as they’re wondering whether they’ve broken a wheel in the pothole that put the suspension travel of their vehicle to its limits.

We think that we may have found a real secret to the success of German roadways: the Unimog. That’s right, the vehicle the name of which comes from German for “universal motorized implement machine”: “Universal-Motorgerät.”

And did we mention that it is a Mercedes?

u

Consider, for example, a Unimog fitted with the ASF500/100 MF asphalt cutter. The cutter has a milling drum with 50 steel cutting bits capable of cutting a width up to 500 mm and an infinitely adjustable depth between 0 and 100 mm. Depending on the road surface, it can cut from 120 to 500 meters per hour.

The Unimog which will celebrate its 60th anniversary on June 3, is so revered in Germany that there’s actually a museum devoted to the hardworking vehicles.

So, want to know the difference between the potholes you’re dodging and those that aren’t in Germany? The word “Mercedes” comes to mind.