Props to Chrysler

“We produced the TV film in honor of all those who put their lives at stake in the hopes of making the world a better place,” said Oliver Francois, President and CEO – Chrysler Brand, Chrysler Group LLC, who is also the Managing Director of Lancia Automobiles. ”In particular, those men and women who are still prisoners, like Aung San Suu Kyi.

“We produced the TV film in honor of all those who put their lives at stake in the hopes of making the world a better place,” said Oliver Francois, President and CEO – Chrysler Brand, Chrysler Group LLC, who is also the Managing Director of Lancia Automobiles. ”In particular, those men and women who are still prisoners, like Aung San Suu Kyi. For Chrysler, this is a chance to use our brand image to join with others in the fight for peace and to knock down the walls that divide us. We at Chrysler believe in doing the right thing and making a difference.”

Maybe this won’t move a whole lot of sheet metal for Chrysler.  But this spot, which was created as part of the Lancia brand’s sponsorship of the 10th World Summit of Nobel Peace Laureates in Berlin November 11-12, a summit that Aung San Suu Kyi, Burma’s pro-democracy leader and 1991 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, who has been in and out of house arrest since 1989, couldn’t attend, just goes to show that car companies have a social role to play and the talent to play it well.

By the way: While some may be concerned that U.S. taxpayer dollars have been utilized inappropriately in the development of this ad, Francois wrote in a letter to Advertising Age: “First, this film was created by Lancia’s Italian ad agency. For efficiencies, it was then re-worked for Chrysler. . . .[N]either the agency nor the leadership of Nobel, nor the other Nobel Prize winners in the film charged us even a penny for it. The only costs were actually spent here in the U.S., to two companies to coordinate and manage the trafficking of this film.”