One Darn Thing After Another. . . .

As if wandering floor mats, over-zealous accelerator pedals, and exploding airbags aren’t enough.

As if wandering floor mats, over-zealous accelerator pedals, and exploding airbags aren’t enough.

Now there’s another potential concern for vehicle manufacturers. Grippers. Myocardial infarctions. That’s right: heart attacks.

According to a release from the University of Basel, five research studies conducted by the Atherosclerosis Research Institute of Howard Hodis at the Keck School of Medicine, University of California, double-blind clinical trials over a three-year period, a collaboration with the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute in Basel, Switzerland, University of California, Berkeley, and a team from the REGICOR Project at the IMIM Hospital in Barcelona, found that the artery wall thicknesses of those living within 100 meters of a highway increased at a rate twice that of those who lived further away.

Apparently, artery wall thickening leads to atherosclerosis: the stiffening and calcification of arteries, which then leads to cardiovascular disease and. . . .

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Studied have shown that rabbits, rats and mice that have inhaled ambient particulate matter from traffic and other sources have accelerated atherosclerosis in the little creatures. This latest study seems to indicate that the same happens for larger mammals, as well.

Apparently, ultrafine particles are five to 10 times as prevalent close to a highway or road than they are 100 to 200 meters away from the road. Consequently, those living or working close to roads could be at risk.

More studies are being conducted.

So, take a deep breath. . . .