Increasing Italian Influence

While it is well known that Fiat’s Sergio Marchione set up an office in Auburn Hills, Michigan, what is perhaps not as widely appreciated is that the Italians are gaining further ground on the U.S. automotive landscape.

While it is well known that Fiat’s Sergio Marchione set up an office in Auburn Hills, Michigan, what is perhaps not as widely appreciated is that the Italians are gaining further ground on the U.S. automotive landscape.

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Item: Last week in Manhattan, The Ferrari Store of New York—yes, that’s its name—opened its doors at the corner of Park Avenue and 55th St., next to the Ferrari Showroom (no, they’re not going to call it something like “Ferrari of Midtown”). The store includes all manner of prancing horse tchotchkes. Or, as the official press release puts it, “Inside visitors will discover a wide range of Ferrari products from lifestyle and fan collections dedicated to Formula 1 and GT enthusiasts, children and collectors.” Quite a trio, that.

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This is Kiera Chaplin at the opening of The Ferrari Store. Do you think we could run something about Italy without throwing in some fashion?

Item (and somewhat more serious): Last week Brembo, the renown Italian brake system supplier, opened its North American headquarters and technical center in Plymouth, Michigan (yes, home of autofieldblog). In addition to which, Brembo announced that its factory in Homer, Michigan, would begin the production and final assembly of corner modules and caliper assemblies for high-performance vehicles starting the 4th quarter of this year. Among the U.S. vehicles that feature Brembo brakes are the Cadillac CTS-V coupe, Chevy Camaro SS, and the Dodge Challenger SRT8. Among the non-domestics there are the Lexus IS-F and LFA models, Nissan GT-R, and Hyundai Genesis 3.8 Track.

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And this could just be the tip of the Italian iceberg (we were hoping that there was an Italian word we could use for iceberg, but wouldn’t you know it: English and Italian are the same).