How to Save Energy

Which type of automotive factory uses the most amount of energy? · Stamping · Parts facilities · Foundries · Machining operations · Assembly plants If you selected “Assembly plants,” then you know your energy usage.

Which type of automotive factory uses the most amount of energy?

· Stamping

· Parts facilities

· Foundries

· Machining operations

· Assembly plants

If you selected “Assembly plants,” then you know your energy usage.

In fact, according to GM, assembly plants use 69% of the total energy used by all five categories. Machining comes in second at just 15%.

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GM has been working with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s ENERGY STAR program to find the ways and means to reduce energy use at its plants. And it has done a good job over the years, based on its performance in the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry.

It has 73 plants that met the challenge by reducing energy use by at least 10% within five years or less.

Notably, in the 20 years that GM has partnered with ENERGY STAR, it has reduced energy intensity by 40% and carbon dioxide emissions by 41% and saved $435-million in energy costs—all while increasing production.

This year, three plants met the challenge for the first time: Baltimore Operations, Rochester Operations and Spring Hill Assembly.

And what’s interesting is that what they did in the plants is arguably common sense (and the sorts of things that one could do at an office or home).

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At GM Rochester: When you aren’t using equipment, Shut It Off

For example, at Spring Hill reduced energy intensity by 33% over just two years by installing variable-frequency drives for pumps and fans as well as fluorescent lighting and LED fixtures.

At GM Rochester they reduced energy intensity by 29% through upgrading heating units, reducing compressed air pressure, adding motion-controlled lighting, installing energy-efficient windows, deploying manufacturing equipment with high-efficiency motors and variable-speed drives, and shutting things off.

“’Shut It Off’ became a catchphrase throughout the plant,” said Bob Randazzo, Rochester Operations site utilities manager.

Who knows? Maybe “Don’t Be Fuelish” might make a return from 1974.