Honda’s EV Approach: One Size Doesn’t Fit All

While many vehicle manufacturers seem to be putting a whole lot of attention on a particular electric vehicle (EV) or two (and with good reason in cases like the Chevy Volt and the Nissan LEAF, because these a production models that they’re looking to start recouping some of the considerable investment with), Honda is undertaking a slightly different tack at present, as it continues to refine its product offerings for the market.

While many vehicle manufacturers seem to be putting a whole lot of attention on a particular electric vehicle (EV) or two (and with good reason in cases like the Chevy Volt and the Nissan LEAF, because these a production models that they’re looking to start recouping some of the considerable investment with), Honda is undertaking a slightly different tack at present, as it continues to refine its product offerings for the market.

Consider this, a Fit-based EV:

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This, a plug-in hybrid based on its Inspire sedan:

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This, the EV-neo electric scooter:

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And this, the Monpal ML200 electric cart:

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This range of products, as well as the associated infrastructure such as charging stations and rental setups, is currently undergoing testing throughout the Kumamoto Prefecture in Japan.

The goals of the real-world study include:

· Assessing the practicality and convenience of the technology (e.g., car sharing and more standard rentals, as well as vehicle range limits)

· Measuring the effectiveness of solar power generation and other renewable energy approaches

· Determining the effects of mobility on the quality of life of the people in the area

Although the proliferation of EVs is going to be predicated on technological developments , such as improved battery technology, it will also be predicated on how people take to the new approaches to mobility, that more purposed-focus vehicles will necessitate.