GM Lansing Assembly Plant Certified Energy Saver

When you think ENERGY STAR certification, you’re probably considering a major appliance or some similar consumer product that carries the sticker from the U.S.

When you think ENERGY STAR certification, you’re probably considering a major appliance or some similar consumer product that carries the sticker from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

But a factory?

The General Motors’ Lansing Delta Township Assembly Plant in Michigan--home of the Buick Enclave, GMC Acadia, and Chevrolet Traverse—has become the first GM plant to get the certification.

This means that not only does the plant meet energy performance levels set by the EPA, but is in the top 25% of similar facilities in the U.S.

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So what are some of the things that the people at the plant do?

Says Scott Whybrew, Lansing regional plant manager, “Every day we stress the importance of building vehicles with the environment in mind.”

Energy use is carefully monitored and controlled every hour, with all non-production energy use kept to a minimum. Energy management is part of monthly performance scorecards (what gets measured gets done). Energy-efficient lighting is used throughout. Employees are asked to provide energy-related suggestions. The building was designed to meet the LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Gold Standard requirements such that it is highly efficient in heating, ventilation and air conditioning. Rainwater collected from the roof is used to flush toilets; about 1-million gallons of potable water are saved each year as a result.

“The collaborative work by our employees to save energy and improve the efficiency of our plant is the key to achieving ENERGY STAR certification,” says Whybrew.