Ford Fashion Design—Sans Car

If you look very closely at this dress, which was designed by Judy Clark, who once worked under the tutelage of the late Alexander McQueen, you’ll notice that it doesn’t necessarily look as though all of its elements are common to things that you might ordinarily see on the runway.

If you look very closely at this dress, which was designed by Judy Clark, who once worked under the tutelage of the late Alexander McQueen, you’ll notice that it doesn’t necessarily look as though all of its elements are common to things that you might ordinarily see on the runway.

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That’s because some of those elements are what you might see on the motorway.

Clark, a Scottish fashion designer, was commissioned by Ford to create a dress—in one week, so it is also an exercise in fast product development—to mark the 100th anniversary of Ford in Britain by using various components of a 2012 Ford Focus.

Zoom in and you’ll see that is a red taillight hanging from her belt (there is actually a set of lights, with the other being on the model’s left side, out of view in this picture). There is a key fob on the zipper pull of the jacket. The jacket was created with seat cover material. Clark also used spray paint, tweed, leather, lace, and “silk chiffon the color of diesel.”

Around her neck is a necklace created by English designer Katherine Hawkins, who also worked with an array of Focus components. Here you’ll see instrument panel switches, dials, coiled springs and the like.

The style of the dress is Edwardian. The Edwardian period began in 1901, with the death of Queen Victoria and lasted, depending on whose calculating, as long at 1919, with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles.

That said, the “silk chiffon the color of diesel” seems like something straight out of Dickens’s Hard Times (he wrote during the Victorian period, however).