Camaro ZL1: Machining More Precise Bores

More detail has come out about the 6.2-liter supercharged V8 Camaro ZL1 engine.

More detail has come out about the 6.2-liter supercharged V8 Camaro ZL1 engine. And now that we’re in the NASCAR season, this comment from Andy Randolph, engine technical director at Earnhardt-Childress Racing, has additional relevance: “It amazes me what GM does with some of their production engines. Deck planting is a time-consuming process that fine tunes the bore to get every ounce of power, torque and durability possible. It’s standard practice when building high-end race engines. It tells me the Camaro ZL1 will have some serious performance.”

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What he’s talking about is deck plate honing the cylinder block.

This is done by clamping simulated cylinder heads—a.k.a., deck plates—to the cylinder block with the same load that the actual heads will be clamped. What happens is that the cylinder bores become slightly distorted as a result of the load. The final boring and honing are done then, when the shape of the cylinders is what it will be when the engine is assembled.

Consequently, the finished bores are nearly ideal for the operation of the engine.  The deckplate machining is performed for Chevy by Linamar in Guelph, Ontario, which also does the process for the LS9 and LS7 engines, which are exclusively available in the Corvette, although you can buy one of the small-blocks as a crate engine and put it in. . . .