Audi Enters ILMC Series

While the sport of motor racing at the highest levels is more political and aggressive than a coffee klatch between staff members of Fox News and MSNBC, the sport itself does advance the technology of vehicles that mere mortals can buy and drive.

While the sport of motor racing at the highest levels is more political and aggressive than a coffee klatch between staff members of Fox News and MSNBC, the sport itself does advance the technology of vehicles that mere mortals can buy and drive.

Audi, which took Le Mans again this year—its ninth victory in the 24-hour-race—has announced its participation in the International Le Mans Cup (ILMC)--seven endurance races to be held in the U.S., Asia, and Europe—organized by the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO). ILMC is said to be heir to the 1953-1984 World Championship for Makes which, according to Audi, “was at times more popular than Formula 1.” (Smack!)

The tech that Audi has successfully brought to bear on sports prototype racing that has ended up in suburban garages includes diesels. Its diesel-powered car won Le Mans in 2006, much to the consternation of gasoline-powered enthusiasts everywhere. The company continues to campaign the powertrain in its R15 TDIs (and offers them in cars even like the A3). Today's racing diesels includes turbochargers with variable turbine technology.

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“In view of the new ACO regulations that will come into effect in 2011, light-weight design combined with high strength and durability, energy recovery and fuel-efficient engines will become even more important than they've been in the past,” says Dr. Wolfgang Ullrich, head of Audi Motorsport. “All of these are topics which our colleagues on the production side at Audi are deeply involved in as well.”

Wouldn't it be nice to have something that looks like this in your driveway?

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