An EV Challenge

One of the challenges that auto companies face when it comes to selling (or more likely leasing) electric vehicles (EVs) is that not only must they convince potential customers of the viability and reliability of the vehicles, not only must they do tremendous work explaining that while it is pretty much like a car it doesn’t make any engine noise because it doesn’t have an engine, not only must they try to overcome the objection that the range is limited even though the person who may buy the car is likely not to regularly commute for a distance that is even a fraction of the total potential battery range. . . they must also help develop the infrastructure for the EVs.

One of the challenges that auto companies face when it comes to selling (or more likely leasing) electric vehicles (EVs) is that not only must they convince potential customers of the viability and reliability of the vehicles, not only must they do tremendous work explaining that while it is pretty much like a car it doesn’t make any engine noise because it doesn’t have an engine, not only must they try to overcome the objection that the range is limited even though the person who may buy the car is likely not to regularly commute for a distance that is even a fraction of the total potential battery range. . . they must also help develop the infrastructure for the EVs.

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This would be like car companies having to install their own gas stations.

Weeks before Kia Motors America is putting the Soul EV on the market in California the company announced that it is installing 17 DC fast chargers. This, the company notes, is in addition to the 198 fast chargers that are already existing in California. They have developed a UVO EVServices telematics app for smartphones that allow Soul EV owners to locate charging stations (and yes, this can be accomplished in the car via the standard 8-inch touchscreen), and the company has partnered with Greenlots, a company that provides access to a network of charge stations.

Kia is installing 50-kW Terra 53 CJ DC fast chargers from ABB in select Kia dealerships. It has established partnerships with Bosch, Leviton and Aerovironment for Level 2 at-home charging stations.

Orth Hedrick, Kia Motors America vp of product planning, said, “Our customers are making a sincere effort to be eco-conscious.”

Clearly Kia—like other OEMs—is making more than a sincere effort to make sure that those customers have the infrastructure they need for their EVs to operate seamlessly and effectively.

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AOGH photo

According to the American Oil & Gas Historical Society, the first gas station was a Gulf station that opened in Pittsburgh in 1913. The organization points out that there is a competing claim that the first was a Standard Oil station in Seattle in 1907.

But note that it isn’t a Ford station or a Chevrolet station. Those companies were busy perfecting cars, not dispensing gas.