Automotive Production

The Automotive Design & Production Production Zone consists of the hardware—tools, machining centers, grinders, etc.—that is used in automotive manufacturing.

Honda Increases the Ability to Flex

By: Gary S. Vasilash - March 30, 2017 at 6:33 AM

One of the phrases that you don’t hear all too often anymore is “production flexibility.” Which means, of course, the wherewithal to make Y is X isn’t selling all that well, or making a shift to Z if the other two are lagging.

Ford’s Approach to Additive Manufacturing

By: Gary S. Vasilash - March 20, 2017 at 6:30 AM

Although 3D printing has become something that is hip an almost artisanal among the digital cognoscenti and within the maker movement, there is the set that contains 3D printing as a subset—additive manufacturing—which is something that is being pursued in earnest by a number of mass manufacturers in order to achieve parts and products the likes of which would be difficult if not completely impossible to produce with conventional methods.

The Toyota Concept-i: Driving 2030

By: Gary S. Vasilash - March 06, 2017 at 3:28 PM

Not all people think that the future of automobiles consists of undifferentiated pod-like structures that will contain people like just so much cargo. Ian Cartabiano and his colleagues at Calty are among them, so they’ve created Concept-i.

Nissan Presses on in England

By: Gary S. Vasilash - March 01, 2017 at 6:30 AM

Nissan’s plant in Sunderland, UK, has completed the installation of a £37-million stamping press line that’s taken 18 months to complete but which provides the plant the ability to produce as many as 2.5-million panels for the vehicles manufactures: the Nissan Juke, Qashqai and Leaf, as well as the Infiniti Q30 and QX30.

Anecdote about Automation

By: Gary S. Vasilash - February 28, 2017 at 6:20 AM

This is the Case IH 8000 Series Austoft sugar cane harvester: According to CNH Industrial, which owns Case, in Brazil, where equipment like this is used, sugar cane harvesting, which had once been a labor-intensive process (as had been the production of cars and components), workers had been able to cut cane at a rate of up to 500 kg per hour.

Rationalization and PSA Sochaux

By: Gary S. Vasilash - February 21, 2017 at 6:55 AM

Should PSA Group acquire Opel, which seems likely (and which may have already happened by the time you read this), there will be what is euphemistically called “rationalization” occurring regarding the companies’ facilities.

Engineering the 2017 Lincoln Continental

By: Gary S. Vasilash - February 06, 2017 at 5:48 AM

Mike Celentino, is chief engineer for the 2017 Lincoln Continental.

Building Bikes

By: Gary S. Vasilash - February 03, 2017 at 5:26 AM

According to the folks at Sculpteo, a 3d printing and engineering services company based outside of Paris, they built what they describe as “the first ever fully functional bike created using digital manufacturing.” To prove that this is a real bike, not a booth exhibit, the two designers of the bike, Alexandre d’Orsetti and Piotr Widelka, rode it from Las Vegas, where it had been on display at CES, to San Francisco, where Sculpteo has a facility.

Big at BMW

By: Gary S. Vasilash - January 11, 2017 at 6:55 AM

Quick—where is the highest volume plant of Bayerische Motoren Werke, more commonly known as “BMW,” located?

Mazda Makes More Crossovers

By: Gary S. Vasilash - December 23, 2016 at 6:49 AM

Think compact crossovers aren’t going to be taking over the roads and highways the world over sometime soon?

Lear’s Creative—and Productive—Approach

By: Gary S. Vasilash - December 13, 2016 at 6:02 AM

When asked what the “secret sauce” is that makes the “Crafted by Lear” approach to next-generation automotive seating development distinctive, Jeneanne Hanley, Lear's vice president for Global Trim and Craftsmanship, has an interesting answer: “Glue.” No, she isn’t referring to a gelatinous adhesive.

Where the Model T Was Born

By: Gary S. Vasilash - December 12, 2016 at 6:11 AM

According to Nancy Darga, the Milwaukee Junction area in Detroit—which is just east of the New Center area, northeast of Wayne State University—was, back in the first two decades of the 20th century, something of a Silicon Valley for the auto industry.